Highs and Not-So-Highs

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collage of graduate with books, computer, various notes about work, butterflies. Image credits Grad Images and Scrap from France

Get a terminal degree, get a job, right? Not so fast. The higher education job market is tight. If your degree is in the humanities, well, best of luck.

Hope springs eternal in the new PhD breast, and so we submit applications and CVs and bombard our committees with requests for reference letters. Sometimes people find a position quickly, but sometimes the search for gainful (and tenure track) employment is a long and discouraging journey.

I am in an unusual position. Yes, I want a position at a university teaching teachers. I think my experience with my research means I have a lot to offer. I also need to start paying off the the student loans I accumulated in six years of graduate school. It’s not a lot by some standards, but it’s more than I like and I’d prefer to get them paid off within two years rather than pay out that interest for five. However, my potential income is bonus income for our family. Our daughters are working adults, my husband’s salary covers all our basic needs, including healthcare, and we have a plan for retirement. I am blessed, and I know it.

Our living situation means I can afford to wait for the right job, rather than take the first offer, no matter when it comes. I’ve had a couple of great interviews, and at least one near miss that let me know I will be an asset wherever I land. Those are the high points. It’s quite satisfying to be in a position to ask the right questions and give the honest answers about how my work fits with education department needs. I’ve enjoyed good give-and-take, some fun personality connections, and new ideas and resources to consider. The process has been educative, to say the least.

On the other hand, it is almost July and I don’t know where I’ll land when school begins in August. Maybe I’ll have a contract for a year. Maybe a tenure track position will open up. Maybe the unexpected will happen. It’s been disappointing when potential contracts fall through for one reason or another. I’m not discouraged, because I’ve learned something valuable each step along the way. The right position in the right place will reveal itself at the right time.

While I wait, I’ll keep learning. I’ll keep submitting proposals and articles. I’ll start taking apart my dissertation for pieces that could be published. I will develop potential classes to teach. Maybe I’ll start a vlog. Maybe I’ll start writing the book I want to write. Hopefully I can do some part-time work to start paying on those pesky student loans. I know one thing for sure. For the first time in six years, I will not be a student in a classroom. And for now, that’s its own reward.

About mrsloomisPhD

I am an accidental artist. I am an on-purpose teacher. I was terrible at art when I was in school. and I said more times than I can count, "I will NEVER be a teacher." God, in His divine sense of humor, has made sure I am now both artist and teacher. Thirty years after earning my first teaching credential I earned a Ph.D. in teaching and learning, majoring in language and literacy. I still work to creatively merge art as text into my research. I am passionate about my Lord, my family, my dogs, music, and naps. I love photography, digital art, running, and just BEING. God is good, and I am blessed.

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